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Activity Box

Stage 1(0-3 months)

Speak Icon Understanding of Language

Book Read

Reading

Find
  • Yourself.
  • Simple storybooks or picture books.
Make
  • Introduce board books and picture books.
  • Repetition helps your baby to build his/her language skills, so look for stories that use the same phrases again and again.
  • To keep him/her interested, vary your voice pitch, or use different voices for different characters.
Play

Research suggests that the sooner you start reading to your baby, the more positive an impact it will have as he grows. Of course, your baby will not understand the meaning of what you say to begin with, but the different rhythms and sounds will help stimulate and develop his language skills and lay good foundations for listening skills later in life. Continue to read to your baby every day for a few minutes if possible, and try different books with flaps and textures as they get older.

SING

Singing

Find
  • Your-self or another adult.
  • Nursery rhymes and Songs.
Make
  •  Sing songs with simple movements and include the actions of the songs.
  •  Songs that include simple actions are:
  1. Incy Wincy Spider.
  2. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.
  3. Five Little Ducks.
  4. Baa Baa Black Sheep.
Play

Nursery rhymes with actions are great for not only capturing your child’s attention, but you can also target language skills and later imitation skills. Your child will enjoy watching you complete the actions in each song. Get close to your child and sing softly and slowly to hear the words you say. Sing any number of songs and have fun moving their arms and legs so that they pretend to dance.

Baby

Tummy Carry and Chats!

Find
  • Yourself.
Make
  • Hold baby close to you in a tummy-down carry.
  • Slide one hand under the tummy and between their legs when carrying baby tummy-down.
  • Chat while you go: “Up!” (lift them slightly); “Down!” (bring them back down); “And All Around!” (Move them left to right).
Play

This is a great activity for helping your baby to begin to understand language. As you pair the movements with the words, your child will begin to attach meaning to these words later in life. Have fun and move them in different directions.